Aida Zabidi
Prior to joining the government service, you are expected to attend an induction. 

When I first received the letter informing me of my attendance, I was a little reluctant. Truth be told, I envisioned a situation where we would be indoctrinated about the joys of the government, and I wasn't looking forward to the weeks of that prior to being introduced to the grueling life of a doctor.

It came and went, thankfully with minimal issues, but surprisingly, a lot of it was relevant and useful to what was to be my upcoming position, actual issues that covered the department structure and pay schemes, and a basic introduction to the world of the Ministry of Health.

One of the sessions we had to sit through was a session on soft skills. Soft skills are a range of skills that emphasize on communication and body language - those little extras that take you from being good in whatever you're doing, to being great. 

I was surprised at the quality of the speakers, who were passionate and very engaging. I was impressed at the approach - the way they had taken into consideration what the public wanted, through the complaints and comments people had made through newspapers, and seemed to be taking active steps to rectify the problems. I was heartened by the fact that they seemed to truly care about being in the government health service and feeling as if they actually wanted us to make a difference.

These days, working for the government seems a lot more exciting, as it seems like we are at the cusp of a turning point, and we are the ones who will be taking healthcare to the next level. We are a new generation of doctors, a new breed of housemen.

Hopefully, we will make a difference.

7 Responses
  1. Real civil servants aren't good . Good civil servants aren't real ? la la la larikkkkkkkkkkk !


  2. no biggie Says:

    a reason for a good course is larger than life. sh*t, man. even the PM cant say anything much. if u make it a walk in a park, it is a walk in a park. coz the park is actually there. sigh. time to get real, hun. take care.


  3. no biggie Says:

    a reason for a good course is larger than life. sh*t, man. even the PM cant say anything much. if u make it a walk in a park, it is a walk in a park. coz the park is actually there. sigh. time to get real, hun. take care.


  4. Yeah, but once you get to know the real deal that's going on within the system itself, the dilemma of ditching the whole thing and just operate happily in private sectors will start haunting you. The laziness and inefficiency of some people drags everybody's effort down. But as you said, hopefully we'll make a difference. I too hope for the same. All the best ^_^


  5. The system's not too bad actually, very comparable for what you get in private practice - especially in Sungai Buloh where I'm at. The only difference is overflow, the type of patients you get etc.

    Especially working, I would say the majority of people in my hospital work very hard from all sectors - and if there is efficiency, usually that's from the sheer amount of people we see.

    Of course there are improvements, but aren't there always? :)


  6. Dang. Then what I'm currently experiencing must be happening... only in Kelantan? Man.


  7. I think it depends from hospital to hospital. Maybe I got lucky?


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